Translate

18 de dezembro de 2020

Caros leitores e seguidores,

O e-Gonomics tomará um breve recesso até meados de janeiro de 2021.



Dear readers and follwers,

The e-Gonomics will take a short break until mid January 2021.




________________



US ECONOMICS



UNEMPLOYMENT



DoL. BLS. December 18, 2020. STATE EMPLOYMENT AND UNEMPLOYMENT -- NOVEMBER 2020

Unemployment rates were lower in November in 25 states and the District of Columbia,
higher in 7 states, and stable in 18 states, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics
reported today. Forty-eight states and the District had jobless rate increases from
a year earlier and two states had little change. The national unemployment rate edged
down by 0.2 percentage point over the month to 6.7 percent but was 3.2 points higher
than in November 2019.

Nonfarm payroll employment increased in 17 states, decreased in 3 states, and was
essentially unchanged in 30 states and the District of Columbia in November 2020.
Over the year, nonfarm payroll employment decreased in 48 states and the District and
was essentially unchanged in 2 states.

This news release presents statistics from two monthly programs. The civilian labor
force and unemployment data are modeled based largely on a survey of households.
These data pertain to individuals by where they reside. The employment data are from
an establishment survey that measures nonfarm employment, hours, and earnings by
industry. These data pertain to jobs on payrolls defined by where the establishments 
are located. For more information about the concepts and statistical methodologies
used by these two programs, see the Technical Note.

Unemployment

Three states had unemployment rates above 10.0 percent in November: New Jersey at 10.2
percent and Hawaii and Nevada at 10.1 percent each. Nebraska and Vermont had the lowest
rates, 3.1 percent each. In total, 26 states had jobless rates lower than the U.S.
figure of 6.7 percent, 11 states and the District of Columbia had higher rates, and 13
states had rates that were not appreciably different from that of the nation.
(See tables A and 1.)

In November, the largest unemployment rate decrease occurred in Hawaii (-4.1 percentage
points). Rates declined over the month by at least 1.0 percentage point in an additional
seven states. The largest over-the-month jobless rate increases occurred in Alaska and
New Jersey (+2.2 percentage points each) and Connecticut (+2.1 points). Eighteen states
had jobless rates that were not notably different from those of a month earlier, though
some had changes that were at least as large numerically as the significant changes.
(See table B.)

The largest unemployment rate increase from November 2019 occurred in Hawaii (+7.5
percentage points). New Jersey and Nevada had the next largest over-the-year rate
increases (6.5 percentage points and 6.4 points, respectively), followed by Texas (+4.6
points), New York (+4.5 points), Connecticut (+4.4 points), and California (+4.3 points).
(See table C.)

Nonfarm Payroll Employment

Nonfarm payroll employment increased in 17 states, decreased in 3 states, and was
essentially unchanged in 30 states and the District of Columbia in November 2020. The
largest job gains occurred in Texas (+61,000), California (+57,100), and New York
(+29,500). The largest percentage increases occurred in Hawaii (+2.6 percent), Louisiana
(+1.0 percent), and Maryland and Utah (+0.9 percent each). Employment decreased in 
Illinois (-20,000, or -0.4 percent), Minnesota (-12,600, or -0.5 percent), and Iowa
(-10,100, or -0.7 percent). (See tables D and 3.)

Over the year, nonfarm payroll employment decreased in 48 states and the District of
Columbia and was essentially unchanged in 2 states. The largest job declines occurred
in California (-1,336,700), New York (-985,400), and Texas (-474,200). The largest
percentage declines occurred in Hawaii (-15.2 percent), New York (-10.0 percent), and
Michigan (-9.4 percent). (See table E.)

Table A. States with unemployment rates significantly different
from that of the U.S., November 2020, seasonally adjusted
--------------------------------------------------------------
                State                |          Rate(p)
--------------------------------------------------------------
United States (1) ...................|           6.7
                                     |              
Alabama .............................|           4.4
Alaska ..............................|           8.1
Arizona .............................|           7.8
California ..........................|           8.2
Connecticut .........................|           8.2
Delaware ............................|           5.1
District of Columbia ................|           7.5
Georgia .............................|           5.7
Hawaii ..............................|          10.1
Idaho ...............................|           4.8
                                     |              
Indiana .............................|           5.0
Iowa ................................|           3.6
Kansas ..............................|           5.6
Kentucky ............................|           5.6
Louisiana ...........................|           8.3
Maine ...............................|           5.0
Minnesota ...........................|           4.4
Missouri ............................|           4.4
Montana .............................|           4.9
Nebraska ............................|           3.1
                                     |              
Nevada ..............................|          10.1
New Hampshire .......................|           3.8
New Jersey ..........................|          10.2
New Mexico ..........................|           7.5
New York ............................|           8.4
North Dakota ........................|           4.5
Ohio ................................|           5.7
Oklahoma ............................|           5.9
South Carolina ......................|           4.4
South Dakota ........................|           3.5
                                     |              
Tennessee ...........................|           5.3
Texas ...............................|           8.1
Utah ................................|           4.3
Vermont .............................|           3.1
Virginia ............................|           4.9
Washington ..........................|           6.0
Wisconsin ...........................|           5.0
Wyoming .............................|           5.1
--------------------------------------------------------------
   (1) Data are not preliminary.
   (p) = preliminary.


Table B. States with statistically significant unemployment rate changes
from October 2020 to November 2020, seasonally adjusted
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                |          Rate         |
                                |-----------|-----------| Over-the-month
             State              |  October  |  November |    change(p)
                                |    2020   |  2020(p)  |
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
Alabama ........................|     5.7   |     4.4   |      -1.3
Alaska .........................|     5.9   |     8.1   |       2.2
California .....................|     9.0   |     8.2   |       -.8
Connecticut ....................|     6.1   |     8.2   |       2.1
Delaware .......................|     5.6   |     5.1   |       -.5
District of Columbia ...........|     8.3   |     7.5   |       -.8
Georgia ........................|     4.5   |     5.7   |       1.2
Hawaii .........................|    14.2   |    10.1   |      -4.1
Idaho ..........................|     5.5   |     4.8   |       -.7
Illinois .......................|     7.4   |     6.9   |       -.5
                                |           |           |          
Indiana ........................|     5.5   |     5.0   |       -.5
Kansas .........................|     5.0   |     5.6   |        .6
Kentucky .......................|     7.3   |     5.6   |      -1.7
Louisiana ......................|     9.4   |     8.3   |      -1.1
Maine ..........................|     5.4   |     5.0   |       -.4
Maryland .......................|     7.7   |     6.8   |       -.9
Massachusetts ..................|     7.4   |     6.7   |       -.7
Michigan .......................|     6.1   |     6.9   |        .8
Mississippi ....................|     7.4   |     6.4   |      -1.0
Nevada .........................|    11.9   |    10.1   |      -1.8
                                |           |           |          
New Hampshire ..................|     4.2   |     3.8   |       -.4
New Jersey .....................|     8.0   |    10.2   |       2.2
New Mexico .....................|     8.1   |     7.5   |       -.6
New York .......................|     9.2   |     8.4   |       -.8
North Dakota ...................|     4.7   |     4.5   |       -.2
Oregon .........................|     6.8   |     6.0   |       -.8
Pennsylvania ...................|     7.4   |     6.6   |       -.8
South Dakota ...................|     3.7   |     3.5   |       -.2
Tennessee ......................|     7.3   |     5.3   |      -2.0
Texas ..........................|     6.9   |     8.1   |       1.2
                                |           |           |          
Virginia .......................|     5.2   |     4.9   |       -.3
Wisconsin ......................|     6.0   |     5.0   |      -1.0
Wyoming ........................|     5.5   |     5.1   |       -.4
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
   (p) = preliminary.


Table C. States with statistically significant unemployment rate changes
from November 2019 to November 2020, seasonally adjusted
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                |          Rate         |
                                |-----------|-----------|  Over-the-year
             State              |  November |  November |    change(p)
                                |    2019   |  2020(p)  |
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
Alabama ........................|     2.7   |     4.4   |       1.7
Alaska .........................|     6.1   |     8.1   |       2.0
Arizona ........................|     4.5   |     7.8   |       3.3
Arkansas .......................|     3.5   |     6.2   |       2.7
California .....................|     3.9   |     8.2   |       4.3
Colorado .......................|     2.5   |     6.4   |       3.9
Connecticut ....................|     3.8   |     8.2   |       4.4
Delaware .......................|     4.0   |     5.1   |       1.1
District of Columbia ...........|     5.3   |     7.5   |       2.2
Florida ........................|     2.8   |     6.4   |       3.6
                                |           |           |          
Georgia ........................|     3.1   |     5.7   |       2.6
Hawaii .........................|     2.6   |    10.1   |       7.5
Idaho ..........................|     2.9   |     4.8   |       1.9
Illinois .......................|     3.7   |     6.9   |       3.2
Indiana ........................|     3.2   |     5.0   |       1.8
Iowa ...........................|     2.8   |     3.6   |        .8
Kansas .........................|     3.1   |     5.6   |       2.5
Kentucky .......................|     4.3   |     5.6   |       1.3
Louisiana ......................|     5.2   |     8.3   |       3.1
Maine ..........................|     3.0   |     5.0   |       2.0
                                |           |           |          
Maryland .......................|     3.4   |     6.8   |       3.4
Massachusetts ..................|     2.8   |     6.7   |       3.9
Michigan .......................|     3.9   |     6.9   |       3.0
Minnesota ......................|     3.3   |     4.4   |       1.1
Mississippi ....................|     5.6   |     6.4   |        .8
Missouri .......................|     3.4   |     4.4   |       1.0
Montana ........................|     3.5   |     4.9   |       1.4
Nevada .........................|     3.7   |    10.1   |       6.4
New Hampshire ..................|     2.6   |     3.8   |       1.2
New Jersey .....................|     3.7   |    10.2   |       6.5
                                |           |           |          
New Mexico .....................|     4.8   |     7.5   |       2.7
New York .......................|     3.9   |     8.4   |       4.5
North Carolina .................|     3.6   |     6.2   |       2.6
North Dakota ...................|     2.4   |     4.5   |       2.1
Ohio ...........................|     4.1   |     5.7   |       1.6
Oklahoma .......................|     3.4   |     5.9   |       2.5
Oregon .........................|     3.4   |     6.0   |       2.6
Pennsylvania ...................|     4.6   |     6.6   |       2.0
Rhode Island ...................|     3.5   |     7.3   |       3.8
South Carolina .................|     2.4   |     4.4   |       2.0
                                |           |           |          
Tennessee ......................|     3.3   |     5.3   |       2.0
Texas ..........................|     3.5   |     8.1   |       4.6
Utah ...........................|     2.4   |     4.3   |       1.9
Vermont ........................|     2.4   |     3.1   |        .7
Virginia .......................|     2.7   |     4.9   |       2.2
Washington .....................|     4.0   |     6.0   |       2.0
West Virginia ..................|     5.1   |     6.2   |       1.1
Wisconsin ......................|     3.5   |     5.0   |       1.5
Wyoming ........................|     3.7   |     5.1   |       1.4
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
   (p) = preliminary.


Table D. States with statistically significant employment changes from
October 2020 to November 2020, seasonally adjusted
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                              |             |             | Over-the-month change(p)
           State              |   October   |   November  |---------------------------
                              |     2020    |    2020(p)  |    Level    |   Percent
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
California ...................|  16,134,300 |  16,191,400 |      57,100 |      0.4
Georgia ......................|   4,494,400 |   4,515,300 |      20,900 |       .5
Hawaii .......................|     543,900 |     557,800 |      13,900 |      2.6
Idaho ........................|     762,200 |     768,400 |       6,200 |       .8
Illinois .....................|   5,712,600 |   5,692,600 |     -20,000 |      -.4
Iowa .........................|   1,513,700 |   1,503,600 |     -10,100 |      -.7
Louisiana ....................|   1,879,100 |   1,897,600 |      18,500 |      1.0
Maryland .....................|   2,630,400 |   2,654,500 |      24,100 |       .9
Massachusetts ................|   3,351,000 |   3,363,200 |      12,200 |       .4
Minnesota ....................|   2,795,400 |   2,782,800 |     -12,600 |      -.5
                              |             |             |             |       
Missouri .....................|   2,779,700 |   2,797,100 |      17,400 |       .6
Nevada .......................|   1,308,600 |   1,317,800 |       9,200 |       .7
New York .....................|   8,805,100 |   8,834,600 |      29,500 |       .3
North Carolina ...............|   4,354,000 |   4,370,500 |      16,500 |       .4
Ohio .........................|   5,217,700 |   5,247,100 |      29,400 |       .6
Pennsylvania .................|   5,616,600 |   5,637,600 |      21,000 |       .4
South Carolina ...............|   2,125,700 |   2,142,000 |      16,300 |       .8
Texas ........................|  12,387,200 |  12,448,200 |      61,000 |       .5
Utah .........................|   1,565,500 |   1,579,600 |      14,100 |       .9
Washington ...................|   3,288,600 |   3,305,200 |      16,600 |       .5
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
   (p) = preliminary.


Table E. States with statistically significant employment changes from
November 2019 to November 2020, seasonally adjusted
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                              |             |             | Over-the-year change(p)
           State              |   November  |   November  |---------------------------
                              |     2019    |    2020(p)  |    Level    |    Percent
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Alabama ......................|   2,079,500 |   2,035,400 |     -44,100 |     -2.1
Alaska .......................|     329,600 |     310,000 |     -19,600 |     -5.9
Arizona ......................|   2,971,800 |   2,893,000 |     -78,800 |     -2.7
Arkansas .....................|   1,277,900 |   1,240,800 |     -37,100 |     -2.9
California ...................|  17,528,100 |  16,191,400 |  -1,336,700 |     -7.6
Colorado .....................|   2,808,900 |   2,680,700 |    -128,200 |     -4.6
Connecticut ..................|   1,692,500 |   1,596,000 |     -96,500 |     -5.7
Delaware .....................|     466,900 |     429,300 |     -37,600 |     -8.1
District of Columbia .........|     803,400 |     750,200 |     -53,200 |     -6.6
Florida ......................|   9,006,700 |   8,588,200 |    -418,500 |     -4.6
                              |             |             |             |      
Georgia ......................|   4,638,700 |   4,515,300 |    -123,400 |     -2.7
Hawaii .......................|     657,700 |     557,800 |     -99,900 |    -15.2
Illinois .....................|   6,105,200 |   5,692,600 |    -412,600 |     -6.8
Indiana ......................|   3,160,800 |   3,055,800 |    -105,000 |     -3.3
Iowa .........................|   1,586,000 |   1,503,600 |     -82,400 |     -5.2
Kansas .......................|   1,423,300 |   1,365,000 |     -58,300 |     -4.1
Kentucky .....................|   1,940,100 |   1,839,500 |    -100,600 |     -5.2
Louisiana ....................|   1,987,800 |   1,897,600 |     -90,200 |     -4.5
Maine ........................|     636,300 |     588,600 |     -47,700 |     -7.5
Maryland .....................|   2,776,100 |   2,654,500 |    -121,600 |     -4.4
                              |             |             |             |      
Massachusetts ................|   3,701,100 |   3,363,200 |    -337,900 |     -9.1
Michigan .....................|   4,442,600 |   4,023,800 |    -418,800 |     -9.4
Minnesota ....................|   2,978,400 |   2,782,800 |    -195,600 |     -6.6
Mississippi ..................|   1,159,900 |   1,135,000 |     -24,900 |     -2.1
Missouri .....................|   2,905,200 |   2,797,100 |    -108,100 |     -3.7
Montana ......................|     486,500 |     471,900 |     -14,600 |     -3.0
Nebraska .....................|   1,031,200 |   1,001,600 |     -29,600 |     -2.9
Nevada .......................|   1,427,300 |   1,317,800 |    -109,500 |     -7.7
New Hampshire ................|     681,700 |     627,200 |     -54,500 |     -8.0
New Jersey ...................|   4,219,200 |   3,896,300 |    -322,900 |     -7.7
                              |             |             |             |      
New Mexico ...................|     862,500 |     801,200 |     -61,300 |     -7.1
New York .....................|   9,820,000 |   8,834,600 |    -985,400 |    -10.0
North Carolina ...............|   4,592,800 |   4,370,500 |    -222,300 |     -4.8
North Dakota .................|     439,500 |     408,300 |     -31,200 |     -7.1
Ohio .........................|   5,583,400 |   5,247,100 |    -336,300 |     -6.0
Oklahoma .....................|   1,705,700 |   1,628,100 |     -77,600 |     -4.5
Oregon .......................|   1,953,200 |   1,830,000 |    -123,200 |     -6.3
Pennsylvania .................|   6,090,200 |   5,637,600 |    -452,600 |     -7.4
Rhode Island .................|     505,200 |     467,500 |     -37,700 |     -7.5
South Carolina ...............|   2,207,800 |   2,142,000 |     -65,800 |     -3.0
                              |             |             |             |       
South Dakota .................|     442,500 |     428,700 |     -13,800 |     -3.1
Tennessee ....................|   3,143,200 |   3,030,400 |    -112,800 |     -3.6
Texas ........................|  12,922,400 |  12,448,200 |    -474,200 |     -3.7
Vermont ......................|     315,400 |     288,200 |     -27,200 |     -8.6
Virginia .....................|   4,087,600 |   3,908,600 |    -179,000 |     -4.4
Washington ...................|   3,496,900 |   3,305,200 |    -191,700 |     -5.5
West Virginia ................|     715,300 |     670,100 |     -45,200 |     -6.3
Wisconsin ....................|   2,974,100 |   2,766,400 |    -207,700 |     -7.0
Wyoming ......................|     289,000 |     274,600 |     -14,400 |     -5.0
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
   (p) = preliminary.

FULL DOCUMENT: https://www.bls.gov/news.release/pdf/laus.pdf



SMALL BUSINESS



DoC. US CENSUS. Small Business Pulse Survey Updates
A retail worker wearing a face mask holds up a sign to indicate that her clothing store is open during the COVID-19 pandemic.
Explore Data
See Data Tables

Based on responses collected December 7 through December 13, the Small Business Pulse Survey estimates that:

  • 21.3% of U.S. small businesses experienced a decrease in the total number of hours worked in the last week by paid employees

  • 12.6% of U.S. small businesses experienced a decrease in the number of paid employees in the last week

  • 45.9% of U.S. small businesses believe more than 6 months of time will pass before their business returns to normal operations. For responses collected 11/16 – 11/22, this statistic was 47.1%
  • 38.5% of U.S. small businesses have experienced a decrease in operating revenue in the last week. For responses collected 11/9 – 11/15, this statistic was 33.4%
  • 72.7% of U.S. small businesses have received financial assistance from the Paycheck Protection Program since March 13, 2020
  • 48.9% of U.S. retail trade businesses experienced domestic supplier delays in the last week
  • 50.4% of small businesses in the #Pittsburgh, #PA Metro Stat Area have experienced decreased operating revenue/sales in the last week

Household Pulse Survey

Based on responses collected November 25 through December 7, the Household Pulse Survey estimates that:
  • 31.0% of American adults expect someone in their household to experience a loss in employment income in the next 4 weeks.
  • 37.3% of adults live in households where at least one adult substituted some or all in-person work for telework because of the coronavirus pandemic
  • 12.7% of American adults lived in households where there was either sometimes or often not enough to eat in the previous 7 days
  • 9.1% of adults are either not current on their rent or mortgage payment, or have slight or no confidence in making their next payment on time
  • Of adults living in households not current on rent or mortgage, 35.3% report eviction or foreclosure in the next two months is somewhat or very likely
  • 35.6% of adults live in households where it has been somewhat or very difficult to pay usual household expenses during the coronavirus pandemic
  • 83.6% of adults in households with post-secondary educational plans had those plans cancelled or changed significantly this fall



INTERNATIONAL TRANSACTIONS



DoC. BEA. December 18, 2020. U.S. International Transactions, Third Quarter 2020. Current Account Deficit Widens by 10.6 Percent in Third Quarter. Current Account Balance, Third Quarter

The U.S. current account deficit, which reflects the combined balances on trade in goods and services and income flows between U.S. residents and residents of other countries, widened by $17.2 billion, or 10.6 percent, to $178.5 billion in the third quarter of 2020, according to statistics released by the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis. The revised second quarter deficit was $161.4 billion.

The third quarter deficit was 3.4 percent of current dollar gross domestic product, up from 3.3 percent in the second quarter.

The $17.2 billion widening of the current account deficit in the third quarter mostly reflected an expanded deficit on goods that was partly offset by an expanded surplus on primary income.



Current Account Transactions (tables 1-5)

Exports of goods and services to, and income received from, foreign residents increased $99.4 billion, to $796.0 billion, in the third quarter. Imports of goods and services from, and income paid to, foreign residents increased $116.6 billion, to $974.5 billion.


Trade in Goods (table 2)

Exports of goods increased $68.4 billion, to $357.1 billion, and imports of goods increased $94.4 billion, to $602.7 billion. The increases in both exports and imports reflected increases in all major categories, led by automotive vehicles, parts, and engines, mainly parts and engines and passenger cars.

Trade in Services (table 3)

Exports of services increased $2.8 billion, to $164.8 billion, mainly reflecting an increase in charges for the use of intellectual property, mostly licenses for the use of outcomes of research and development, that was partly offset by a decrease in travel, primarily education-related travel. Imports of services increased $6.5 billion, to $107.7 billion, mainly reflecting increases in charges for the use of intellectual property, mostly licenses for the use of outcomes of research and development; in transport, primarily sea freight transport; and in travel, primarily other personal travel.

Primary Income (table 4)

Receipts of primary income increased $26.8 billion, to $238.7 billion, and payments of primary income increased $11.9 billion, to $190.6 billion. The increases in both receipts and payments mainly reflected increases in direct investment income, primarily earnings.

Secondary Income (table 5)

Receipts of secondary income increased $1.4 billion, to $35.3 billion, reflecting an increase in private transfers, mostly private sector fines and penalties, that was partly offset by a decrease in general government transfers, mainly government sector fines and penalties. Payments of secondary income increased $3.7 billion, to $73.5 billion, reflecting increases in private transfers, primarily private sector fines and penalties, and in general government transfers, mostly international cooperation.

Capital Account Transactions (table 1)

Capital transfer receipts increased $0.3 billion, to $0.4 billion, in the third quarter, reflecting the U.S. Department of State’s sale of a property in Hong Kong.

Financial Account Transactions (tables 1, 6, 7, and 8)

Net financial account transactions were −$221.1 billion in the third quarter, reflecting net U.S. borrowing from foreign residents.

Financial Assets (tables 1, 6, 7, and 8)

Third quarter transactions decreased U.S. residents’ foreign financial assets by $73.0 billion. Transactions decreased other investment assets, mostly currency and deposits, by $288.1 billion. Transactions in deposits included a net withdrawal by the U.S. Federal Reserve of $203.0 billion from deposits abroad related to the ending of currency swaps. Transactions increased direct investment assets, mostly equity, by $71.1 billion; portfolio investment assets, mostly equity securities, by $142.2 billion; and reserve assets by $1.8 billion.

Liabilities (tables 1, 6, 7, and 8)

Third quarter transactions increased U.S. liabilities to foreign residents by $172.0 billion. Transactions increased direct investment liabilities, both equity and debt, by $70.5 billion and portfolio investment liabilities, mostly equity securities, by $147.5 billion. Transactions decreased other investment liabilities, mostly loans, by $46.0 billion.

Financial Derivatives (table 1)

Net transactions in financial derivatives were $24.0 billion in the third quarter, reflecting net lending to foreign residents.

Updates to Second Quarter 2020 International Transactions Accounts Balances

Billions of dollars, seasonally adjusted
 Preliminary estimateRevised estimate
Current account balance−170.5−161.4
    Goods balance−219.3−219.5
    Services balance54.460.9
    Primary income balance29.233.2
    Secondary income balance−34.9−35.9
Net financial account transactions−82.6−206.6




FED / NOMINATION



FED. December 18, 2020. Christopher J. Waller sworn in as a member of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System. Christopher J. Waller sworn in virtually as governor.

Chair Powell swears in Christopher J. Waller virtually on December 18, 2020 as a member of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System.

Christopher J. Waller took the oath of office on Friday as a member of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System. The oath was administered remotely via videoconference by Chair Jerome H. Powell. Dr. Waller took the oath at his residence in St. Louis in the company of family and friends.

On January 16, President Trump announced his intention to nominate Dr. Waller to an unexpired term as a Board member, ending on January 31, 2030. He was confirmed by the United States Senate on December 3.

Biography

Christopher J. Waller took office as a member of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System on December 18, 2020, to fill an unexpired term ending January 31, 2030.

Prior to his appointment at the Board, Dr. Waller served as executive vice president and director of research at the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis since 2009.

In addition to his experience in the Federal Reserve System, Dr. Waller served as a professor and the Gilbert F. Schaefer Chair of Economics at the University of Notre Dame. He was also a research fellow with Notre Dame's Kellogg Institute for International Studies. From 1998 to 2003, Dr. Waller was a professor and the Carol Martin Gatton Chair of Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics at the University of Kentucky. During that time, he was also a research fellow at the Center for European Integration Studies at the University of Bonn. From 1992 to 1994, he served as the director of graduate studies at Indiana University's Department of Economics, where he also served as associate professor and an assistant professor.

Dr. Waller received a BS in economics from Bemidji State University and an MA and PhD from Washington State University.



VENEZUELA



U.S. Department of State. 12/18/2020. The United States Takes Actions Against Supporters of the Illegitimate Maduro Regime’s Fraudulent Elections. Michael R. Pompeo, Secretary of State

The United States has sanctioned Ex-Cle Soluciones Biométricas C.A. (Ex-Cle C.A.) for their support of the illegitimate Maduro regime’s fraudulent December 6 legislative elections.  The Treasury Department action also targets Guillermo Carlos San Agustin and Marcos Javier Machado Requena for having acted for or on behalf of Ex-Cle C.A.  San Augustin, a dual Argentine and Italian national, is a co-director, the administrator, a majority shareholder, and ultimate beneficial owner of Ex-Cle C.A.  Machado, a Venezuelan national, is a co-director, the president, and a minority shareholder of Ex-Cle C.A.

Ex-Cle C.A. has millions of dollars of contracts with the illegitimate Maduro regime, providing electoral hardware and software to regime-aligned government agencies.  Ex-Cle C.A. was aware of and involved in the regime’s efforts to rig the fraudulent December 6 elections, thereby undermining democracy and suppressing the voices of the Venezuelan people.  Ex-Cle C.A. also helped Maduro’s coopted National Electoral Council to purchase thousands of voting machines from China, routing payments thru the Russian financial system.  They shipped the voting machines through Iran using rogue airlines Mahan Air and Conviasa, both previously targeted by the Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Assets Control.

Those who seek to undermine free and fair elections in Venezuela must be held accountable.  Maduro’s reliance on companies like Ex-Cle C.A., as well as recently-sanctioned PRC tech firm CEIEC, to rig the electoral processes should leave no doubt that the December 6 legislative elections were fraudulent and do not reflect the will of the Venezuelan people.  We urge all countries committed to democracy to condemn the fraudulent December 6 elections and the illegitimate regime’s continuing efforts to destroy democracy in Venezuela.



CHINA



DoC. December 18, 2020. Commerce Adds China’s SMIC to the Entity List, Restricting Access to Key Enabling U.S. Technology

WASHINGTON – The Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) in the Department of Commerce (Commerce) added Semiconductor Manufacturing International Corporation (SMIC) of China to the Entity List.  BIS is taking this action to protect U.S. national security.  This action stems from China’s military-civil fusion (MCF) doctrine and evidence of activities between SMIC and entities of concern in the Chinese military industrial complex. 

“We will not allow advanced U.S. technology to help build the military of an increasingly belligerent adversary.  Between SMIC’s relationships of concern with the military industrial complex, China’s aggressive application of military civil fusion mandates and state-directed subsidies, SMIC perfectly illustrates the risks of China’s leverage of U.S. technology to support its military modernization,” said Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross. 

“Entity List restrictions are a necessary measure to ensure that China, through its national champion SMIC, is not able to leverage U.S. technologies to enable indigenous advanced technology levels to support its destabilizing military activities,” added Ross.

The Entity List designation limits SMIC’s ability to acquire certain U.S. technology by requiring U.S. exporters to apply for a license to sell to the company.  Items uniquely required to produce semiconductors at advanced technology nodes—10 nanometers or below—will be subject to a presumption of denial to prevent such key enabling technology from supporting China’s military-civil fusion efforts.

BIS also added more than sixty other entities to the Entity List for actions deemed contrary to the national security or foreign policy interest of the United States.  These include entities in China that enable human rights abuses, entities that supported the militarization and unlawful maritime claims in the South China Sea, entities that acquired U.S.-origin items in support of the People’s Liberation Army’s programs, and entities and persons that engaged in the theft of U.S. trade secrets.

The Entity List is a tool utilized by BIS to restrict the export, re-export, and transfer (in-country) of items subject to the Export Administration Regulations (EAR) to persons (i.e., individuals, organizations, and companies) reasonably believed to be involved, or to pose a significant risk of becoming involved, in activities contrary to the national security or foreign policy interests of the United States.  Additional license requirements apply to exports, re-exports, and transfers (in-country) of items subject to the EAR to listed entities, and the availability of most license exceptions is limited.

DoC. December 18, 2020. Statement from Secretary Ross on The Department's 77 Additions to the Entity List for Human Rights Abuses, Militarization of the South China Sea and U.S. Trade Secret Theft

Today, the Commerce Department added 77 entities to the Entity List for actions deemed contrary to the national security or foreign policy interest of the United States.  These include entities in China that enable human rights abuses, entities that supported the militarization and unlawful maritime claims in the South China Sea, entities that acquired U.S.-origin items in support of the People’s Liberation Army’s programs, and entities and persons that engaged in the theft of U.S. trade secrets.

Secretary Ross provided the following statement:

“China’s corrupt and bullying behavior both inside and outside its borders harms U.S. national security interests, undermines the sovereignty of our allies and partners, and violates the human rights and dignity of ethnic and religious minority groups.   Commerce will act to ensure that America’s technology—developed and produced according to open and free-market principles—is not used for malign or abusive purposes. 

“China actively promotes the reprehensible practices of forced labor, DNA collection and ubiquitous surveillance to repress its citizens in Xinjiang and elsewhere.  Over the last two years this administration has added nearly 50 entities to the Entity List for their support for the Chinese Communist Party’s despicable offensive against vulnerable ethnic minorities.  With these new additions, we are applying those principles to the rest of China, including in Tibet, and to the authoritarian regimes to which these practices are being exported.

“The additions also include entities that have contributed to China’s militarization of disputed outposts in the South China Sea, unlawful maritime claims in the South China Sea, and intimidation and coercion of other coastal states lawfully accessing and developing offshore marine resources.

“Commerce added additional persons participating in China’s campaign of malign technology acquisition efforts, including for theft of U.S. trade secrets, and the support of research and development, and production of advanced weapons systems, in support of the People’s Liberation Army’s destabilizing military modernization efforts.”

U.S. Department of State. 12/18/2020. The Free World’s Leadership Will Defeat COVID-19. Michael R. Pompeo, Secretary of State

It has now been a year since China first identified a patient in Wuhan stricken with an unknown pneumonia, now known as COVID-19. Since then, the United States and other free nations, such as Germany and the United Kingdom, have led a remarkable and unprecedented vaccine development effort that is delivering hope across the world.

This is no accident. Time and again, democracies that value transparency, the rule of law, property rights, and free-market capitalism have produced innovative solutions to public health crises. Freedom unleashes human potential, and competition spurs better outcomes, at lower costs.

In contrast, authoritarian regimes control information and stifle innovation. The Chinese Communist Party punished brave Chinese scientists, doctors, and journalists who tried to alert the world to the dangers of the spreading virus, allowing a controllable outbreak to become a global pandemic.

Even today, nearly a year after the world first learned of the outbreak, the Chinese Communist Party is still spreading disinformation regarding the virus and obstructing a World Health Organization investigation into its origin and spread. It is also peddling vaccines that lack essential data on safety and efficacy, due to a fundamental disregard for transparency and accountability regarding results from clinical trials. Both actions put Chinese citizens, and the world, at risk.

Nations of the world should demand transparency from Beijing about the origin and spread of the pandemic that has led to more than one million lives lost and millions of livelihoods ruined. If they do not do so, China’s record of public-health crises makes another future pandemic originating from China depressingly likely.

U.S. Department of State. 12/18/2020. U.S. Imposes New Sanctions on People’s Republic of China Actors Linked to Malign Activities. Michael R. Pompeo, Secretary of State

The Chinese Communist Party’s malign activity at home and abroad harms U.S. interests and undermines the sovereignty of our allies and partners.  The United States will use all countermeasures available, including actions to prevent People’s Republic of China (PRC) companies and institutions from exploiting U.S. goods and technologies for malign purposes.  Today’s actions mark yet another sign of our resolve.

The United States is imposing new restrictions on certain entities for activities that undermine our national security and foreign policy interests.  Specifically, the Department of Commerce is adding 59 PRC entities to its export-control Entity List.

Mass Surveillance, Military Modernization, and Human Rights Abuses

The United States is adding four entities to the Entity List for enabling human rights abuses within China by providing DNA-testing materials or high-technology surveillance equipment to the PRC government.  We urge the Chinese Communist Party to respect the human rights of the people of China, including Tibetan Buddhists, Christians, Falun Gong members, Uyghur Muslims, and members of other ethnic and religious minority groups.

Additionally, the Department of Commerce is adding nineteen entities to the Entity List for systematically coordinating and committing more than a dozen instances of theft of trade secrets from U.S. corporations to advance the PRC defense industrial complex; engaging in activities that undermine U.S. efforts to counter illicit trafficking in nuclear and other radioactive materials; or using U.S. exports to support the PLA and PRC defense industrial base, whose ultimate goal is to surpass the capabilities of other countries they view as competitors, particularly the United States.

South China Sea

These new restrictions also impose costs on Beijing’s unlawful campaign of coercion in the South China Sea.  The Department of Commerce is adding 25 shipbuilding research institutes affiliated with the China State Shipbuilding Corporation to the Entity List, as well as six other entities that provide research, development, and manufacturing support for the People’s Liberation Army Navy or attempted to acquire U.S.-origin items in support of PLA programs.  Commerce is also adding five PRC state-owned enterprises, including the China Communications Construction Company, for their role in coercion of South China Sea claimant states.



THE QUAD (AUSTRALIA / INDIA / JAPAN)



U.S. Department of State. 12/18/2020. U.S.-Australia-India-Japan Consultations (“The Quad”) Senior Officials Meeting

Senior officials from the United States, Australia, India, and Japan met virtually today as part of regular Quad consultations to advance a free, open, and inclusive Indo-Pacific region.  Today’s meeting followed the productive discussions held in Tokyo during the second Quad Foreign Ministers’ Meeting on October 6, 2020.

The four democracies discussed practical ways to cooperate on countering disinformation, to strengthen supply chain resiliency, and to coordinate efforts to support countries vulnerable to malign and coercive economic actions in the Indo-Pacific region.  The participants also explored opportunities for future Quad engagement on topics ranging from humanitarian assistance and disaster relief to coordinating efforts on COVID response and vaccines and expanding coordination in multilateral forums, including the United Nations and related organizations.

The officials reviewed recent strategic developments throughout the Indo-Pacific region, including the South China Sea, Hong Kong, Taiwan, and the Mekong sub-region.  The officials reaffirmed the Quad’s strong support for ASEAN centrality and ASEAN-led regional architecture.  The four countries welcome the opportunity to continue regular consultations, including at the Ministerial, senior official, and working levels as a testament to the growing diversity and depth of engagement among the Quad members.



PHILLIPINE



U.S. Department of State. 12/18/2020. Secretary Pompeo’s Call with Philippine Secretary of Foreign Affairs Locsin

Secretary of State Michael R. Pompeo spoke today with Philippine Secretary of Foreign Affairs Teodoro Locsin, Jr.  Secretary Pompeo and Secretary Locsin discussed opportunities to further reinforce the U.S.-Philippine alliance and the binding nature of the 2016 arbitral tribunal award on all parties in the South China Sea.  The two secretaries also discussed the economic, security, democratic, and people-to-people ties that make up the strong bond between our two countries.



SURINAME



U.S. Department of State. 12/18/2020. Deputy Secretary Biegun’s Meeting with Surinamese Minister of Foreign Affairs Ramdin

Deputy Secretary of State Stephen E. Biegun  met virtually yesterday with Surinamese Foreign Minister Albert Ramdin.  Deputy Secretary Biegun and Foreign Minister Ramdin discussed the United States’ support for Suriname’s continued engagement with the International Monetary Fund on economic reform, creating a transparent investment climate, and strengthening bilateral and regional security cooperation.  The Deputy Secretary also congratulated the Foreign Minister on the recent announcement of another oil discovery off the coast of Suriname.  Deputy Secretary Biegun  emphasized the United States’ willingness to strengthen U.S.-Surinamese relations under the Santokhi administration and desire to revitalize Suriname’s economy through U.S. investment to benefit the citizens of both nations.



________________



ORGANISMS



LATIN AMERICA



CEPAL. 18/12/2020. Balance Preliminar de las Economías de América Latina y el Caribe 2020
DICIEMBRE 2020

En su edición 2020, el Balance Preliminar de las Economías de América Latina y el Caribe examina el comportamiento de las economías de la región durante el año, y actualiza las cifras de crecimiento y otros indicadores que reflejan el impacto sufrido por los países de la región a raíz de la crisis del COVID-19. En particular, el documento presenta nuevas estimaciones del producto interno bruto (PIB) para la región y todos sus países en 2020 y entrega una primera estimación de crecimiento para 2021. El informe analiza los efectos económicos provocados por la pandemia en cada país a la luz de los acontecimientos de los últimos meses, y brinda recomendaciones de políticas para enfrentarlos, sobre todo en materia fiscal y monetaria, junto con resaltar la importancia de cooperación internacional.


La región de América Latina y el Caribe marcará una contracción de -7,7% en 2020, pero tendrá una tasa de crecimiento positiva de 3,7% en 2021, debido principalmente a un rebote estadístico que, sin embargo, no alcanzará para recuperar los niveles de actividad económica pre-pandemia del coronavirus (en 2019).

AMÉRICA LATINA Y EL CARIBE: PROYECCIÓN DE LA TASA DE VARIACIÓN DEL PIB, 2021a (En porcentajes)

DESCRIPCIÓN

En su edición 2020, el Balance Preliminar de las Economías de América Latina y el Caribe examina el comportamiento de las economías de la región durante el año, y actualiza las cifras de crecimiento y otros indicadores que reflejan el impacto sufrido por los países de la región a raíz de la crisis del COVID-19. En particular, el documento presenta nuevas estimaciones del producto interno bruto (PIB) para la región y todos sus países en 2020 y entrega una primera estimación de crecimiento para 2021. El informe analiza los efectos económicos provocados por la pandemia en cada país a la luz de los acontecimientos de los últimos meses, y brinda recomendaciones de políticas para enfrentarlos, sobre todo en materia fiscal y monetaria, junto con resaltar la importancia de cooperación internacional.

ÍNDICE
  • Resumen ejecutivo
  • Capítulo I. Tendencias de la economía mundial
  • Capítulo II. La liquidez mundial
  • Capítulo III. El sector externo
  • Capítulo IV. La actividad económica
  • Capítulo V. Los precios internos
  • Capítulo VI. Empleo y salarios
  • Capítulo VII. Las políticas macroeconómicas
  • Capítulo VIII. Perspectivas económicas y riesgos que enfrentará América Latina y el Caribe en 2021
  • Anexo estadístico.
DOCUMENTO: https://repositorio.cepal.org/bitstream/handle/11362/46501/18/S2000881_es.pdf



________________



ECONOMIA BRASILEIRA / BRAZIL ECONOMICS



BRASIL - UE



MRE. DCOM. NOTA À IMPRENSA Nº 168. 18/12/2020. VII Diálogo Político de Alto Nível Brasil-UE – 18/12/2020 – Declaração Conjunta

A VII Reunião do Diálogo Político de Alto Nível entre Brasil e União Europeia (UE) ocorreu em 18 de dezembro de 2020, por videoconferência, no âmbito da Parceria Estratégica Brasil-UE.

As duas delegações mantiveram intercâmbio muito aberto e frutífero sobre uma ampla gama de assuntos, incluindo o estado das relações bilaterais, defesa, política comercial, meio ambiente e segurança, bem como sobre temas regionais e multilaterais.

As delegações trocaram impressões sobre a situação atual da pandemia de COVID-19 e concordaram em continuar o diálogo e a cooperação bilaterais sobre a crise sanitária em curso, bem como sobre o processo de recuperação econômica e social em ambas as regiões.

Reafirmaram seu compromisso com o Acordo de Associação Mercosul-UE e sublinharam a importância que atribuem à sustentabilidade e às questões ambientais, juntamente com os benefícios socioeconômicos esperados para ambos os lados e o reforço da cooperação política entre os dois blocos.

A reunião se deu na sequência de diversos diálogos e consultas bem-sucedidos entre Brasil e UE que tiveram lugar em 2020, apesar da pandemia, sobre temas-chave como direitos humanos, meio ambiente e sustentabilidade, segurança cibernética e drogas ilícitas, o que demonstra a solidez da Parceria Estratégica Brasil-UE.

O Diálogo Político de Alto Nível foi co-presidido pelo Embaixador Kenneth Haczynski da Nóbrega, Secretário de Negociações Bilaterais no Oriente Médio, Europa e África do Ministério das Relações Exteriores do Brasil e pelo Sr. Enrique Mora, Secretário-Geral Adjunto para Assuntos Políticos do Serviço Europeu para a Ação Externa (SEAE) da União Europeia.



ECONOMIA



MEconomia. 18/12/2020. BALANÇO. Brasil será a maior fronteira de investimentos do mundo em 2021, aponta ministro da Economia. Em coletiva para apresentar balanço das ações da pasta em 2020 e perspectivas para o próximo ano, Guedes ressaltou que a vacinação vai garantir o retorno seguro ao trabalho e promover o crescimento

Em 2021, o Brasil será a maior fronteira de investimentos do mundo, apontou nesta sexta-feira (18/12) o ministro da Economia, Paulo Guedes, em entrevista coletiva durante a qual apresentou o balanço das medidas econômicas adotadas em 2020 e perspectivas para o próximo ano. “Teremos oportunidades em gás natural, setor elétrico, saneamento, cabotagem logística, as concessões, as privatizações”, disse o ministro.

Ele destacou a importância do esforço fiscal que superou os R$ 620 bilhões este ano para proteger a saúde dos brasileiros, apoiar a população vulnerável e preservar empregos e empresas diante dos impactos da pandemia do novo coronavírus. “Sempre dissemos que íamos surpreender o mundo. O presidente nos indicou a necessidade de salvar vidas e preservar empregos”, afirmou.

Guedes ressaltou que os esforços do governo conseguiram preservar a economia e que agora há claros sinais de recuperação, com cenário pronto para a retomada do crescimento em 2021. O ministro disse que a chegada da vacinação contra a Covid-19 será passo decisivo para essa recuperação. “O capítulo mais importante – pois essa luta não está encerrada– é a vacinação em massa, que contará com R$ 20 bilhões”, destacou o ministro. Ele citou que saúde e economia andam juntas. “Tem que ter vacina para todo mundo, gratuita. O retorno seguro ao trabalho, com a vacinação, vai fazer o país voltar a voar”, declarou

“E para voltar a voar, é preciso bater as duas asas ao mesmo tempo, a da recuperação econômica e a da saúde”, afirmou. A plena decolagem econômica só será possível com o retorno seguro ao trabalho, continuou o ministro, lembrando da edição da Medida Provisória nº 1.015/2020, na quinta-feira (17/12), que abriu crédito extraordinário de R$ 20 bilhões em favor do Ministério da Saúde para a vacinação dos brasileiros contra a Covid-19.

Medidas

Guedes lembrou que o Auxílio Emergencial foi extremamente importante para dar suporte aos brasileiros mais desassistidos, para terem renda e conseguirem enfrentar a crise gerada pela pandemia. Mas explicou que o Auxílio Emergencial — que faz parte das medidas emergenciais restritas ao ano de 2020 — tem custo mensal de R$ 55 bilhões. Ou seja, o custo de toda a vacinação, que permitirá o retorno seguro ao trabalho, representa cerca de dez dias de Auxílio Emergencial.

No começo de 2020, o Brasil estava se recuperando, com cenário positivo, lembrou Guedes. “Com a pandemia, tivemos de mudar nossa agenda de reformas estruturais para a construção de programas emergenciais”, disse.

Além do destaque ao Auxílio Emergencial, protegendo as camadas mais necessitadas da população, o ministro ressaltou, entre outras medidas, o auxílio de cerca de R$ 190 bilhões a estados e municípios (incluindo os R$ 60 bilhões do Programa Federativo de Enfrentamento ao coronavírus), estímulos ao crédito, à produção nacional de ventiladores pulmonares, desonerações de medicamentos e Programa Emergencial de Manutenção do Emprego e da Renda (o BEm), que teve orçamento de R$ 51,6 bilhões e preservou mais de 10 milhões de empregos formais.

“Vamos chegar ao final do ano com zero perda formal. Não acho que isso tenha acontecido em nenhum outro país”, disse o ministro da Economia. Ele ressaltou que será essencial promover a retomada sustentada da economia, pois é tarefa do país dar assistência aos 38 milhões de brasileiros “invisíveis” que foram revelados quando começou a ser pago o Auxílio Emergencial. São pessoas que não tinham conta em banco ou CPF ativo, por exemplo, e que atuavam como autônomos, informais.

Reformas

Na avaliação do ministro, a agenda de reformas, indispensável para a saúde da economia, não foi deixada de lado nem na fase mais crítica da crise gerada pela pandemia. A nova Lei de Falências, por exemplo, foi aprovada em novembro. O projeto que garante autonomia ao Banco Central foi aprovado pelo Senado e agora espera análise da Câmara dos Deputados.

O novo marco legal para o setor de gás recebeu mudanças no Senado e, agora em dezembro, retornou para a Câmara. Já o projeto da “BR do Mar”, que estimulará a navegação de cabotagem, foi aprovada na Câmara e seguiu para o Senado.

No começo deste ano, lembrou ele, já haviam sido apresentadas ao Congresso Nacional as propostas de Reforma Administrativa e os marcos do Pacto Federativo. Esses e outros projetos já estão nas mãos dos parlamentares e dependem agora da tramitação política para serem aprovados e começarem a gerar resultados positivos para a economia, explicou Guedes. “Para sermos fraternos, para atendermos o lado social, precisamos de responsabilidade fiscal. Acho que o eixo político vai aprovar as reformas”, disse.

Compromissos

Paulo Guedes reforçou o compromisso com a manutenção da política de responsabilidade fiscal e de cuidado com o dinheiro público. Disse que haverá aceleração do programa de desestatização. O ministro lembrou, ainda, da importância dos ajustes feitos desde o início do governo, que permitiram a redução da taxa de juros (a Selic está em 2% ao ano, o patamar mais baixo da história), o CDS (Credit Default Swap, instrumento que mede o risco-país) nos menores níveis dos últimos cinco anos.

Os indicadores são positivos, assinalou Guedes, e apontam para a retomada do crescimento sustentado, com base em investimentos, retomada da agenda de reformas e responsabilidade fiscal em 2021. “Este ano  a boa política funcionou, o dinheiro foi para todo mundo (em referência aos repasses a todos os estados e municípios) e o Auxílio Emergencial foi para todo mundo que precisava”, afirmou.

“Mas não podemos usar a doença como desculpa para a irresponsabilidade fiscal”, disse Guedes, advertindo que no caso de uma nova exigência emergencial na área de saúde, toda a estrutura do governo está pronta para promover uma “ação fulminante e decisiva como da primeira vez”. Guedes disse ainda que os desafios de 2020 foram sendo superados com ações integradas entre os três Poderes e que o ritmo de avanços será mantido no próximo ano. “Estamos construindo uma grande sociedade aberta. As alianças serão orgânicas”, reforçou.



SETOR EXTERNO



BACEN. 18 Dezembro 2020. BC divulga Estatísticas do Setor Externo com os dados atualizados até novembro de 2020.​​​​​​ Estatísticas do setor externo

1. Balanço de pagamentos


As transações correntes foram superavitárias em novembro, US$202 milhões, ante déficit de US$3,1 bilhões em novembro de 2019. Este foi o sétimo superávit em transações correntes nos últimos oito meses. Essa reversão seguiu a tendência observada nos últimos meses e decorreu das reduções de US$2,8 bilhões e de US$507 milhões nos déficits em renda primária e serviços. O superávit da balança comercial de bens manteve o nível do ocorrido em novembro de 2019. O déficit em transações correntes somou US$12,2 bilhões (0,82% do PIB) nos doze meses encerrados em novembro, ante déficit de US$15,5 bilhões (1,02% do PIB) nos doze meses até outubro.


As exportações de bens totalizaram US$17,6 bilhões em novembro, o que representou recuo de 0,9% ante novembro de 2019. As importações de bens totalizaram US$14,7 bilhões, com declínio de 1,1%. No acumulado do ano as exportações recuaram 7,2% e as importações, 13,9%. Com esses resultados, o superávit comercial atingiu US$44,3 bilhões de janeiro a novembro, superior ao superávit de US$35,4 bilhões observado no mesmo período de 2019.

O déficit na conta de serviços manteve tendência de retração e totalizou US$1,8 bilhão no mês, recuo de 22,3% ante novembro de 2019, quando atingiu US$2,3 bilhões. A conta de viagens internacionais permanece evidenciando os impactos da pandemia, com diminuição interanual de 81,9% nas despesas líquidas, para US$144 milhões em novembro de 2020, ante US$792 milhões em novembro de 2019. Destaque-se também, na mesma base comparativa, a redução de 45,7% nas despesas líquidas de transportes, de US$466 milhões para US$253 milhões. A conta de aluguel de equipamentos apresentou despesas líquidas de US$743 milhões, nível semelhante ao de novembro de 2019.

Em novembro de 2020, o déficit em renda primária recuou 73,4% em relação a novembro de 2019 e totalizou US$1,0 bilhão. As despesas líquidas de lucros e dividendos atingiram US$157 milhões, recuo significativo em comparação com despesas líquidas de US$2,8 bilhões em novembro de 2019. Esse resultado decorreu da combinação de diminuição nas despesas em US$2,2 bilhões, para US$1,7 bilhão, e do aumento nas receitas em US$518 milhões, para US$1,5 bilhão. As despesas líquidas com juros somaram US$881 milhões no mês, retração de 17,0% na comparação interanual, com recuo das receitas e das despesas. No acumulado do ano, o déficit em renda primária totalizou US$35,1 bilhões, 31,3% inferior aos US$51,2 bilhões registrados em período correspondente de 2019.


No mês, os ingressos líquidos em investimentos diretos no país (IDP) somaram US$1,5 bilhão, ante US$8,7 bilhões observados em novembro de 2019. Houve ingressos líquidos de US$1,3 bilhão em participação no capital e de US$200 milhões em operações intercompanhia. Nos doze meses encerrados em novembro o IDP totalizou US$36,3 bilhões (2,44% do PIB), de US$43,5 bilhões (2,86% do PIB) no mês anterior.  


Em novembro de 2020 os fluxos líquidos de investimentos diretos no exterior (IDE) apresentaram regressos líquidos ao país (desinvestimentos) de US$1,7 bilhão, ante aplicações líquidas no exterior de US$3,1 bilhões em novembro de 2019.  


Pelo sexto mês consecutivo ocorreram ingressos líquidos em instrumentos de portfólio negociados no mercado doméstico. Ingressaram em novembro US$6,8 bilhões, dos quais US$5,4 bilhões em ações e fundos de investimento e US$1,4 bilhão em títulos de dívida. Nos onze primeiros meses do ano ocorreram saídas líquidas de US$14,8 bilhões, ante saídas líquidas de US$2,4 bilhões no mesmo período do ano anterior. Nos doze meses encerrados em novembro as saídas líquidas de investimentos em portfólio no mercado doméstico somaram US$19,1 bilhões.  

2. Reservas internacionais

O estoque de reservas internacionais atingiu US$356,0 bilhões em novembro, aumento de US$1,5 bilhão em comparação ao mês anterior. As operações nos diferentes instrumentos de intervenção no mercado de câmbio – US$400 milhões de retornos líquidos em linhas com recompra e US$787 milhões de vendas à vista – contribuíram em US$387 milhões para reduzir o estoque de reservas internacionais. A receita de juros atingiu US$407 milhões. As variações por paridades e por preço contribuíram para aumentar o estoque, respectivamente, em US$368 milhões e US$895 milhões.

3. Estimativas e parciais – dezembro de 2020

Para o mês de dezembro a estimativa para o resultado em transações correntes é de superávit de US$500 milhões, enquanto a de IDP é de ingressos líquidos de US$2,6 bilhões.

As parciais para o mês de dezembro, até o dia 15, são apresentadas nas tabelas a seguir:




INFLAÇÃO



CNI. 18/12/2020. Confiança do consumidor brasileiro segue baixa no quarto trimestre de 2020. Pesquisa da CNI mostra que, apesar de registrar uma leve melhora na comparação com setembro, o INEC de dezembro segue abaixo de sua média histórica e é inferior ao registrado no mesmo mês de 2019. De acordo com a pesquisa, apesar da retomada da economia, os brasileiros avaliam que o desemprego e a inflação continuarão em alta em 2021

Com o início da retomada da atividade econômica, a confiança do consumidor brasileiro registrou uma leve melhora neste último trimestre de 2020, mas permanece baixa. O Índice Nacional de Expectativa do Consumidor (INEC), da Confederação Nacional da Indústria (CNI), subiu de 42,8 pontos em setembro para 43,8 pontos em dezembro.

Valores abaixo de 50 pontos indicam falta de confiança do consumidor. Quanto mais abaixo de 50 pontos, maior e mais disseminada é a falta de confiança. O indicador de dezembro, além de estar abaixo da linha divisória dos 50 pontos, é inferior ao registrado em dezembro de 2019, quando ficou em 47,3 pontos. Ele também segue abaixo de sua média histórica, de 46 pontos. Os dados são da pesquisa da CNI divulgada nesta sexta-feira (18). 

Desemprego e inflação continuarão em alta em 2021, avaliam consumidores

De acordo com a pesquisa, apesar da retomada da economia, os brasileiros avaliam que o desemprego e a inflação continuarão em alta em 2021. O índice de expectativa do desemprego avançou 1,5 ponto frente a setembro, para 66,6 pontos, e o de inflação, 0,4 ponto, para 71,9 pontos.

"Ambos os índices seguem muito acima do que era observado em dezembro de 2019, marcando a deterioração das expectativas dos consumidores para essas variáveis econômicas no ano de 2020", diz a pesquisa.

Os consumidores, no entanto, têm uma expectativa de alta tanto em relação à própria renda quanto à compra de bens de maior valor. Em dezembro, na comparação com setembro, o índice de expectativa em relação à própria renda subiu 3,1 pontos, para 47,5 pontos. O de expectativa de compra de bens de maior valor aumentou 1,4 ponto, para 55,8 pontos.

Em dezembro frente a setembro, a percepção dos consumidores em relação à própria situação financeira avançou 2,5 pontos, para 47,9 pontos, e o de endividamento caiu 1 ponto, para 49,8 pontos.

Brasileiros com faixa de renda média estão mais confiantes

A pesquisa revela que os brasileiros com faixa de renda média (entre um e cinco salários mínimos) estão mais confiantes. Para pessoas de faixa de renda elevada e menos elevada (mais de cinco salários mínimos ou menos de um salário mínimo), o INEC ficou estável.

"Cabe também ressaltar que as pessoas cuja renda familiar é maior que cinco salários mínimos foram as que tiveram a pior deterioração no índice de expectativa do consumidor em relação a dezembro de 2019”, diz o documento.

Entre as regiões, o Norte, o Centro-Oeste e o Nordeste registraram um avanço maior do INEC. O Sudeste e, em menor medida, o Sul seguem mais distantes do nível de confiança pré-crise.

Em relação à escolaridade, pessoas com ensino superior completo estão mais confiantes, com índice de 44,2 pontos. As com ensino médio e fundamental da 5ª à 8ª série apresentam índice igual, de 43,6 pontos. Pessoas com formação até a 4ª série do ensino fundamental apresentam o menor indicador, de 44 pontos.

INEC - Índice Nacional de Expectativa do Consumidor. Confiança do consumidor se recupera em dezembro, mas segue baixa

Em dezembro, a confiança do consumidor se recuperou levemente em relação a setembro, mas continua abaixo do registrado em dezembro de 2019. As expectativas dos consumidores seguem se deteriorando para variáveis econômicas como o desemprego e a inflação, mas vêm melhorando com relação à perspectiva futura de própria renda e com relação à intenção de compra de bens de maior valor.




INDÚSTRIA



FGV. IBRE. 18/12/2020. Prévia da Sondagem da Indústria de dezembro sinaliza aumento da confiança

A prévia da Sondagem da Indústria de dezembro sinaliza aumento de 1,5 ponto do Índice de Confiança da Indústria (ICI) em relação ao número final de novembro, para 114,6 pontos. Se o resultado se confirmar, esse será o maior valor do índice desde junho de 2010 (114,6 pontos).

A alta no resultado prévio da confiança da indústria é consequência de avaliações mais positivas sobre o momento presente e otimismo em relação aos próximos meses. O Índice de Situação Atual aumentaria 1,6 pontos, para 119,8 pontos (o maior valor desde outubro de 2007, 119,9 pontos), enquanto o Índice de Expectativas subiria 1,4 ponto, para 109,3 pontos.

O dado preliminar desse mês indica queda de 0,6 ponto percentual (p.p.) do Nível de Utilização da Capacidade Instalada da Indústria (NUCI), para 79,1%. Em médias móveis trimestrais, o NUCI continuaria apresentando avanço pelo sexto mês consecutivo, de 79,2% para 79,5%.

DOCUMENTO: https://portalibre.fgv.br/noticias/previa-da-sondagem-da-industria-de-dezembro-sinaliza-aumento-da-confianca

CNI. 18/12/2020. Custo do trabalho na indústria brasileira cai puxado por ganho de produtividade. Estudo da CNI mostra que custo do trabalho caiu 3,6%, em 2019, em relação aos principais parceiros comerciais do país. Indicador está em queda desde 2012. Custo do trabalho na indústria brasileira cai puxado por ganho de produtividade

O custo unitário do trabalho (CUT) na indústria brasileira diminiu 3,6% no ano passado frente à média dos principais parceiros comerciais do Brasil. Entre 11 países analisados, o Brasil apresentou a terceira maior queda no indicador, atrás apenas de Argentina e França.

Conforme estudo da Confederação Nacional da Indústria (CNI), o principal fator para a queda no CUT no país foi o aumento da produtividade do trabalho. Apesar de ter crescido 0,6%, foi o segundo melhor desempenho, atrás apenas da Coreia do Sul, que teve alta de 1,4% no indicador no período. 

“Apesar de ser um aumento pouco significativo, o Brasil apresentou o segundo melhor desempenho frente aos competidores, o que impacta positivamente a competitividade. A produtividade do trabalho efetiva, a que compara o Brasil com a média de nossos principais parceiros comerciais, registrou alta de 2,9%”, explica a economista Samantha Cunha.

A maioria dos parceiros comerciais do Brasil registrou diminuição na produtividade do trabalho. Além de Brasil e Coreia do Sul, apenas México e Estados Unidos não registraram queda no indicador.

O salário real também contribuiu para a queda do indicador em 2019, mas em menor grau. A redução foi de 1,3% frente à média dos salários reais dos parceiros comerciais. Já a taxa de câmbio reduziu um pouco a competitividade do país frente aos demais países, com apreciação de 0,6% do real frente às moedas dos parceiros entre 2018 e 2019.

Desde 2012, o CUT está em queda e, entre 2011 e 2019, teve redução acumulada de 29%. O principal fator para essa trajetória foi a depreciação cambial: o real desvalorizou-se 24,7% frente às moedas dos parceiros no período. 

A produtividade do trabalho também teve impacto significativo nesse ganho de competitividade. O indicador brasileiro cresceu 12% frente à média dos demais países entre 2011 e 2019. Já o salário médio real segurou o avanço maior na competitividade. Ele cresceu 14,7% no período, acima dos ganhos de produtividade.


Custo do trabalho mantém queda em 2020, marcado pela recessão econômica

A previsão é que, em 2020, o custo de trabalho apresente queda, mantendo a trajetória dos últimos dois anos. No entanto, essa redução ocorre em um contexto de recessão econômica causada pela pandemia de covid-19, com queda do PIB e do emprego. A produtividade deve ter uma contribuição pequena, com crescimento próximo de zero pelo terceiro ano seguido, o que preocupa. 

“A queda do CUT se dá em um contexto de queda do PIB e do emprego, sendo determinada sobretudo pela forte depreciação do real, resultado da fuga de capitais de países emergentes, como o Brasil”, analisa a CNI.

O CUT é um dos principais determinantes da competitividade de um país e representa o custo em dólar com o trabalho para a produção de uma unidade de produto. É calculado a partir dos resultados da produtividade no trabalho, do salário médio real pago aos trabalhadores e da taxa de câmbio.

Indicadores de competitividade-custo. Custo Unitário do Trabalho cai frente a competidores

Em 2019, o custo unitário do trabalho (CUT) na Indústria brasileira caiu 3,6% relativamente à média do CUT nas indústrias dos principais parceiros comerciais do País, como mostra o indicador de custo unitário do trabalho efetivo, medido em dólar real. Em 2019, o principal determinante para a queda do CUT foi a produtividade do trabalho efetiva, que cresceu 2,9%, frente a 2018. Para 2020, o CUT efetivo deve apresentar queda, mantendo a trajetória dos últimos anos.




CONSTRUÇÃO CIVIL



CNI. 18/12/2020. Nível de atividade e utilização da capacidade operacional da construção crescem. Sondagem Indústria da Construção revela maior nível de uso da capacidade do setor em seis anos. Dados apontam alta da atividade pelo quarto mês consecutivo e que empresários seguem otimistas e confiantes. Avanço da confiança é resultado de uma forte melhora da percepção dos empresários com relação à situação atual

O nível de atividade da construção civil registrou alta pelo quarto mês consecutivo, confirmando a tendência de crescimento do setor. É o que mostra a Sondagem Indústria da Construção, relativa a novembro, divulgada nesta sexta-feira (18) pela Confederação Nacional da Indústria (CNI). A pesquisa aponta crescimento considerável da utilização da capacidade operacional, que atingiu 63%, o maior nível desde dezembro de 2014.

De acordo com os dados, o índice de atividade da indústria da construção em novembro foi de 50,3 pontos. Ainda que tenha apresentado ligeira queda na comparação mensal com outubro, se manteve acima da linha divisória de 50 pontos, indicando aumento do nível de atividade da construção em relação ao mês anterior.

No entanto, diferentemente de outubro, o desempenho favorável da indústria da construção não resultou em alta de empregos. O nível de emprego ficou em 49,1 pontos, abaixo da linha divisória de 50 pontos, o que indica queda no número de empregados frente a outubro, embora a pontuação esteja acima de sua média histórica de 44,1 pontos.

Capacidade operacional no maior nível desde 2014

A alta de 61% para 63% da Utilização da Capacidade Operacional (UCO), depois de um leve recuo registrado em outubro, aponta a retomada da trajetória de crescimento iniciada em maio.

“A Sondagem Indústria da Construção deste mês mostra que o setor continua se recuperando bem depois da pandemia e tende a continuar a trajetória de crescimento em 2021. Essa projeção se confirma cada vez mais a partir do registro do maior nível de utilização da capacidade operacional desde 2014”, afirma o gerente de Análise Econômica da CNI, Marcelo Azevedo.

Expectativas do empresário da construção seguem altas

A Sondagem Indústria da Construção detalha ainda que as expectativas dos empresários do setor seguem otimistas em dezembro e a confiança permanece em alta, com intenção de investimento mantendo-se estável, em patamar elevado.

Segundo os dados, o índice de Confiança do Empresário Industrial da Indústria da Construção (ICEI-Construção) cresceu 1,2 ponto em dezembro, alcançando 60,1 pontos. O resultado aponta que a confiança do empresário da construção está se tornando cada vez mais forte e disseminada. O ICEI-Construção cresce desde maio, com exceção do mês de outubro, quando ficou estável.

De acordo com análise da CNI, o avanço da confiança da construção em dezembro se deu principalmente por uma forte melhora da percepção dos empresários com relação à situação atual e ao futuro da economia brasileira, enquanto os índices de condições e expectativas quanto às próprias empresas também avançaram, mas em menor medida.

A intenção de investir da indústria da construção, por sua vez, ficou estável entre novembro e dezembro. O índice aumentou 0,3 ponto e alcançou 42,7 pontos.

Sondagem Indústria da Construção. Utilização da capacidade operacional cresce em novembro

Em novembro, a atividade da construção teve um desempenho positivo e a Utilização da Capacidade Operacional (UCO) atingiu 63%, o maior valor desde dezembro de 2014. Os empresários da construção seguem confiantes e com expectativas otimistas.




COMÉRCIO EXTERIOR BRASILEIRO



ABIEC. REUTERS. 18 DE DEZEMBRO DE 2020. Brasil quer exportar 6% mais carne bovina em 2021, mira novos mercados
By Ana Mano

SÃO PAULO (Reuters) - Os produtores de carne bovina do Brasil planejam aumentar os volumes exportados em 6% no ano que vem, à medida que negociam acesso a novos mercados na Ásia e América do Norte, disse a Associação Brasileira das Indústrias Exportadoras de Carnes (Abiec) nesta sexta-feira.

A Abiec estimou que o Brasil, maior fornecedor global da proteína, pode exportar 2,141 milhões de toneladas no próximo ano, volume avaliado em 8,789 bilhões de dólares.

O Brasil está negociando acordos para venda de carne bovina “in natura” para Canadá, Japão, Coreia do Sul e México, disseram autoridades da Abiec. Atualmente, o Brasil exporta o produto processado para o Canadá.

Juntos, esses países importam cerca de 1,3 milhão de toneladas de carne bovina “in natura” por ano, ou cerca de 12,5% do mercado internacional.

A Abiec disse que as empresas brasileiras poderiam fornecer cerca de 260 mil toneladas por ano para os quatro países, representando receita potencial de 1,5 bilhão de dólares.

Ainda assim, a China continuaria sendo responsável pela maior parte das exportações de carne bovina do Brasil, após abocanhar 42,2% dos embarques entre janeiro e novembro deste ano, segundo a Abiec.

O Brasil possui atualmente 35 fábricas autorizadas a vender produtos para a China, e busca a aprovação para outras 26 unidades no curto prazo, afirmou Antônio Camardelli, presidente da Abiec.

Em relação a 2020, o Brasil está encerrando o ano com exportações recordes de carne bovina, com o setor sendo menos afetado do que concorrentes globais devido à pandemia.

As exportações histórias do Brasil ocorreram em meio a interrupções nas operações de algumas unidades em países como os Estados Unidos e Austrália, como consequência do coronavírus.

Segundo apresentação da Abiec, “quase nenhum” frigorífico brasileiro teve de parar operações em função de questões de saúde relacionadas à Covid-19.

As exportações do país sul-americano devem fechar 2020 com um valor sem precedentes de 8,533 bilhões de dólares, com volumes embarcados em um ano superando 2 milhões de toneladas pela primeira vez, segundo a Abiec.

No ano passado, as exportações brasileiras de carne bovina atingiram 7,6 bilhões de dólares, com embarques de 1,866 milhão de toneladas.



ENERGIA



OPEP. REUTERS.18 DE DEZEMBRO DE 2020. Preços do petróleo sobem e engatam 7º ganho semanal consecutivo
By Laura Sanicola

(Reuters) - O petróleo terminou esta sexta-feira no maior nível em nove meses, engatando a sétima semana consecutiva de ganhos, com investidores focados no avanço de vacinas contra a Covid-19 e na desvalorização do dólar.

A Pfizer solicitou aprovação do Japão para sua vacina, que já está sendo utilizada no Reino Unidos e Estados Unidos. O vice-presidente norte-americano, Mike Pence, disse que a aprovação do país ao imunizante da Moderna pode ocorrer ainda nesta sexta-feira.

O petróleo Brent fechou em alta de 0,76 dólar, ou 1,5%, a 52,26 dólares por barril, após tocar a marca de 52,48 dólares, mais alto patamar desde março.

Já o petróleo dos EUA (WTI) avançou 0,74 dólar, ou 1,5%, para 49,10 dólares o barril, depois de atingir 49,28 dólares, maior nível desde fevereiro.

O dólar registrou uma leve recuperação nesta sexta, mas permaneceu próximo às mínimas de dois anos e meio vistas na véspera. A divida norte-americana desvalorizada torna o petróleo e outras commodities mais baratas para compradores que possuem outras moedas.

A queda semanal do dólar “é um movimento significativo para baixo, e está empurrando o complexo petróleo para cima”, disse John Kilduff, sócio da Again Capital em Nova York.

Reportagem adicional de Alex Lawler, Sonali Paul e Shu Zhang


________________

LGCJ.: